CS Exclusive: Gyms Offer Nightclub Inspired Classes

Barry’s Bootcamp in New York.

On most Friday and Saturday nights, many of your members will be sweating it out at a local bar or dance club. However, a new fitness trend has emerged that’s allowing members to sweat it out inside your club. Providing for high-intensity music, energy and in some cases, even ‘shots’ — the new trend allows members to have just as much fun as they would during a night out on the town, while working out and staying healthy.

“Our motto is, ‘where exercise meets entertainment,’” said Jennifer Brugh, the creator of Nightclub Cardio, a total body workout set to hits from the 50s, 60s, 70s, 80s, 90s and today. “We try to make fitness fun. It’s not fun for a lot of people so they don’t do it. We found that a lot of people like to dance — but might not want to go to a traditional nightclub. We dim the lights and dance for exercise,” she said.

Nightclub Cardio offers the class at nightclubs, but also certifies instructors to host the class in gyms. Currently, it costs $179 to get certified to teach Nighclub Cardio, and plans are in place to create a virtual training certification, said Brugh. “It’s the number one most requested class at the downtown YMCA in Houston, Texas,” she said.

Barry’s Bootcamp in New York City offers a similar class, called “Dance Party Bootcamp” that treats participants to a disco ball, live DJ, Go-Go dancers, bouncer, velvet ropes and ‘shots’ of wheat grass in place of alcohol. The New York location decided to host the class on Saturdays after the co-owner, Joey Gonzalez, was repeatedly approached by members, “who wanted to feel like they were going out while still working out,” said Kate Rose, a representative from Barry’s Bootcamp. “We’ve typically been sold out ever since we started. Typically there’s a waiting list,” she said.

Due to the popularity both of Nightclub Cardio, Dance Party Bootcamp and similar classes — it may not be a bad idea to implement a similar class at your club. Treat your members to high-intensity, popular music and give them a ‘nightclub-esque’ experience in the club of your own. In most cases, doing so will give members a fun and healthier alternative to barhopping.

 

By Rachel Zabonick

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