The Power of Small Group Training

Picture 1Becky Ambriz, 40, has been a member of The Rush Fitness Complex in Knoxville, Tenn., for eight years. A year ago she began participating in small group training (SGT). Ambriz turned to SGT after realizing that working out on her own failed to motivate her to the intensity she craved. “I tend to not push myself as hard when I’m working out on my own,” she said.

The Rush’s SGT program, “Ignite SGT,” was designed specifically for members such as Ambriz who needed a bit of extra motivation to follow a routine. By combining the group mentality of Group X classes with the personalized attention of personal training, SGT proved to be just what Ambriz needed in order to find success. “The workouts are non-stop, can’t-catch-your-breath hard work!” said Ambriz. “[It’s] very intense, but exactly what I needed.”

In fact, Ambriz’s favorite aspect of SGT is its intensity. “The workouts are hard,” she said. “Sometimes I think there’s no way I can do that exercise, and then I’ve done it. I’ve surprised myself, and that gives me the confidence to do the next hard exercise. I’ve had many people come up to me after class just to say how impressed they were with the workout we just did, and that’s very rewarding.”

Success for Ambriz has been defined by her ability to maintain the 90-pound weight loss she achieved over the past few years. “SGT has helped me maintain my weight loss and build muscle,” she said. “The workouts include weight training, cardio and lots more. It’s been a good balance for me.”

During SGT classes at The Rush, strength and cardio are supplemented by a variety of pieces of equipment, including The Rush’s signature piece, “The Ring of Fire” — a large fitness octagon with eight stations, including monkey bars and suspension training. It is one of The Rush’s most eye-catching pieces of equipment. However, Ambriz explained SGT allows for a wide variety of useful equipment.

“What haven’t we used?” asked Ambriz. In a SGT class, Ambriz has used everything from 300-pound tires to battle ropes, BOSU balls, dumb bells, stairs and more. “Some days we use a lot of equipment, and other days we might use one item,” she continued. “I really like the creativity the different trainers offer. They have their own style, and a lot of times, that’s my motivation for taking a class.”

Ambriz pays $79 a month for unlimited SGT classes, which she normally attends around five days per week. “It’s much more affordable [than personal training] and I don’t have to set up appointments,” said Ambriz. “[The Rush] offers classes in the morning, lunch time, evening and Saturdays. I was paying a lot more for personal training and this was a great alternative for me.”

In addition to being a fan of SGT’s affordability, Ambriz said she loves the class construction as well. “I’ve done personal training before, and to be honest, working out in a group setting isn’t very much different from one-on-one,” she said. “I’ve gotten to know the trainers, and for me personally, I still get the attention I need from them and from the workout. They take the time to talk with us after class to get feedback.”

Ultimately, Ambriz couldn’t be happier with the results The Rush’s SGT has provided. “I’m the healthiest I’ve been in a long time, and part of that is from SGT,” she said. “My strength and balance have improved, I feel stronger and really enjoy the workouts, and that keeps me coming back.”

If you go to The Rush’s website, you’ll find “Stories of Transformation,” or testimonials such as Ambriz’s, stating how members found success using many of The Rush’s programs. Has one of your members found success through SGT? Ask that member’s permission to highlight their story on your website. The more members who know about the power of your SGT program, the quicker you’ll see it take off!

 

By Rachel Zabonick

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