Building Relationships Through Corporate Wellness

Corporate Fit Challenge

Mike Gelfgot, an Anytime Fitness franchisee, started offering corporate wellness programs through his Anytime Fitness clubs after a low-cost competitor moved into the market. “We were watching our numbers dwindle down in that one market and we started asking ourselves higher quality questions,” he recalled.  

One of the biggest things that came to Gelfgot’s mind was that no one in their town was an expert when it came to corporate wellness and prevention.

In problem-solving mode, Gelfgot turned to the industry at large. He was introduced to Trina Gray, the CEO of Bay Athletic Club, who had created a successful Corporate Fit Challenge.

Gelfgot purchased the rights to Gray’s Corporate Fit Challenge, which offers 30 days of free gym access, 30 days of personal training and three team workouts, and began offering it at his club. Those participating in the program also get a fitness evaluation before and after so they can see their results. 

Gelfgot said in a traditional gym setting, the membership team sells and the PT team takes over, but when you have a competitor that mentality doesn’t work. He explained that everyone has to work together. 

The Corporate Fit Challenge not only proved to be a great profit center, but it also allowed his personal trainers to contribute with sales after they were trained on how to pitch the program.

At first, Gelfgot struggled with getting through to the right people to get his program up and running. Just like any sales process, he had to schedule meetings and do Q&As on why the business operator would want to incorporate his corporate wellness program.

Every organization knows that prevention is key to living a healthy life. However, Gelfgot quickly realized that most businesses with their own corporate wellness programs were struggling with operating the program — with it being run by employees who didn’t have the skillset to get it off the ground. They also struggled to inspire and motivate people to get started and to finish the program — a skillset that his personal trainers naturally thrive at.

Through this experience, he now recommends working with smaller businesses with five to 50 members in the programs — that’s where he’s been the most successful.

Lastly, once you sell a program and a business completes it, Gelfgot recommends hosting a gala to recognize success that includes awards and cool prizes.

“You recognize people in public for their hard work during the Corporate Fit Challenge,” said Gelfgot. “It’s a lot of fun.”

1 Comment

  1. Robert Thomas

    August 30, 2019 at 6:52 pm

    Great article. What do you suggest when the company had their HQ based in another city.

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