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Personal Training The Pulse

Transitioning with Members as Their Health Changes

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Crunch Fitness.
Personal training at Crunch Fitness.

Personal training at Crunch Fitness.

Personal trainers may start working with a client who is perfectly healthy. However, life’s circumstances don’t always keep those clients unimpaired — injuries, illnesses and other various health ailments, along with aging, affect almost everyone at one point or another. Therefore, being able to train clients as their health changes is the key to running a successful personal training program.

Jennifer Cassetty, a personal trainer at Crunch Fitness, recognized this and earned ACSM’s Health Fitness Specialist certification to be able to properly transition with clients as their health changed. “When you’re working with people, their health changes all the time, especially as they age,” said Cassetty. “If you want your clients for the long-term, you have to be able to transition with them as their health changes.”

As a Health Fitness Specialist, Cassetty gained knowledge that allowed her to work with clients suffering from chronic and temporary health conditions, such as diabetes and cancer. “I have worked with post-rehab patients, pre- and post-natal clients, diabetics and recent cardiac-arrest victims,” detailed Cassetty.

The American Cancer Society estimated over 1 million people to be diagnosed with some form of cancer in 2012. In addition, the American Diabetes Association reported in 2011 (the most recent study) that 8.3 percent of Americans had diabetes. Taking these statistics into account, it’s highly likely some of your members are described in the statistics. Having a certification such as Cassetty’s provides Crunch Fitness the opportunity to continually serve members through an illness.

Cassetty’s specialty certification has provided her the opportunity to network with physicians and physical therapists, who have then referred their clients to her services at Crunch Fitness.

To gain an ACSM Health Fitness Specialist certification, a minimum of a Bachelor’s degree in exercise science, exercise physiology or Kinesiology is required. In addition, trainers must be adult CPR and AED-certified.

A similar certification includes the American Council on Exercise’s Advanced Health and Fitness Specialist certification, which provides trainers with the expertise to train clients who work with clients recovering from cardiovascular, pulmonary, metabolic and musculoskeletal issues.

According to Cassetty, becoming an ACSM Health Fitness Specialist has been extremely beneficial, helping her land every job she’s ever had. “My first two jobs required I have this particular certification,” she said. “It’s been very valuable.”

 

By Rachel Zabonick

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Rachel Zabonick

Rachel Zabonick is the editor-in-chief of Club Solutions Magazine. She can be reached at rachel@peakemedia.com.

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