Marketing: What You Should Know About Glassdoor

Glassdoor. Editorial credit: / Shutterstock.com

As a business, it’s likely you’ve already accepted the fact that customers are going to review your business online, whether it’s through Yelp, Google or Facebook, for example.

But have you accepted the fact that in some cases, your employees are now reviewing your business as well?

Recently I was doing research on a health club for an upcoming story and came across reviews on Glassdoora website that allows employees (current and former) to anonymously review companies and management.

The New Yorker described Glassdoor as “a Yelp for workplaces.” Author Lizzie Widdicombe explained, “Among the site’s features are company ratings, based on how many stars the employees award the organization, on a scale of one to five; and C.E.O. approval ratings, given as a percentage of how many people approve of the company’s leadership.”

Just as Google and Facebook give your customers a voice — Glassdoor does so for your staff. And the site has grown in popularity, reporting that55 million unique users visit Glassdoor’s mobile applications and website monthly.” In addition, a survey conducted by Software Advice found, “Almost half of all respondents use Glassdoor at some point in their job search.”

So, how should your company be using Glassdoor? That depends, but here are a few things to consider.

First, see if your company has a profile on Glassdoor. Just like with Google, your business may already have a profile with dozens — or even hundreds — of reviews you didn’t even know about.

If your company does have a profile already, consider “claiming the business” through either a free employer account or a paid one. The free account will allow you to respond to any reviews as an official employer representative, in addition to updating information such as your company description and mission statement. A paid account will allow you to advertise open job positions and glean insights from enhanced analytics.

However, even the free account has benefits. According to Glassdoor, “Adding employer branding, ‘Why work for us?’ content and company benefits helps attract two times more qualified job candidates.”

Second, decide how you’ll respond to both positive and negative reviews. Just like you do with Google and Yelp, consider what strategy you’ll take for responding to feedback from current and former employees. Some companies only respond to negative feedback. Others don’t respond to any feedback at all.

Owen Tripp, the CEO of Grand Rounds, told Forbes this is his policy for both positive and negative reviews: “Express appreciation for the employee taking the time to write the review, don’t get defensive about criticism, and extend a peace offering like an invitation to discuss the issue.”

Whatever you do, be consistent — if you respond to one comment, people will expect you to respond to them all.

Finally, one of the last things to consider when it comes to Glassdoor is what to do with the feedback you’re given. As with other review sites, this often comes down to a case-by-case basis. However if you notice common themes popping up — for example, if people constantly complain about a poor work environment or too little benefits, take notice and consider taking action. Glassdoor comments can sometimes be the canary in the coal mine to serious underlying issues.

“With the prevalence of social media, your organization shouldn’t be afraid of open and direct dialogue,” said Jim Conti of SproutSocial. “After all, whether you listen or not, people are talking about your brand. So ask yourself: Is it really better to look the other way, or should you guide the conversation as much as possible — making sure you’re striking the right match between employer and employee?”

What are your thoughts?

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